Offline Event Marketing Ideas

Offline Event Marketing Ideas

For many businesses and events, digital marketing is key. Online ads and social media marketing have become incredibly accurate, and act as a measurable tool for reaching the target audience of your event.

But what if you want to create something real? Something more tangible?

To keep your event and its brand at the front of your audience’s mind, you can cover an entire spectrum of marketing techniques, including complimenting your digital marketing efforts with offline marketing campaigns.

There’s still an abundance of ways to engage with your local audience and regional fans in a tangible way. Here are a few great ways to start:

Be where your fans are

When creating a physical offline marketing campaign it’s always important to think about not just how you’re going to reach your fans and audience, but also where you’ll reach them.

For example, if you’re running a punk rock gig, are there any shops or bars you think your audience might go to? You could consider targeting tattoo parlors or skate shops, or anywhere that might play music similar to yours. It’s about hitting the locations that suit your niche.

By doing a bit of research you’ll be able to get in front of your potential audience in an organic way. You won’t just be reaching out to their existing customers, they’ll also be reaching yours.

Great design creates excitement

Creating posters and flyers has always been an essential part of event promotion and they can still be incredibly effective alongside a digital campaign. Having a well-designed poster can set the tone of your event and is a great tool to communicate with your potential audience visually.

They can inform and motivate ticket buyers and become a part of your event’s physical history.

There are  2 things you’ll need to consider when creating your flyers and posters:

  1. Design: What kind of emotion and message do you want to convey? Punk? Corporate? Professional? Handmade? You can use this design on all your physical marketing materials as well as your online campaigns. This ensures your event branding is consistent and instantly recognizable.
  2. Distribution: Posting your flyers on telephones poles won’t quite be enough. You need your posters and flyers to be exactly where your potential audience will be.

You can even use social media to reach out to brands or businesses that share an audience with you and ask if they’d be happy sharing your posters and flyers on your behalf, creating a partnership with them.

Offer meet and greets

If you have a well-known speaker or artist performing at your event, you have the potential to hold VIP meet and greet experiences at your venue. It’s great to do this in advance of your event, as it acts as an effective way to reach and engage your audience and generate excitement for your event. It’s also a great opportunity to sell tickets!

If you do manage to secure a partnership with any local businesses you could reach out to them and see if they’d be interested in holding the meet and greet at their location. This way you’re being where your fans are and it’s mutually beneficial to both you and your partner.

Create a contest with ticket giveaways

Nothing gets people quite as excited as a freebie does! Contests are not only a great way to promote your event, but also act as a great way to engage with your audience.

  • You can use your potential partners by doing ticket giveaways that require visiting their place of business. Or create a prize that’s a combination of your tickets and maybe a gift card (or similar) prize from your partner. Once again creating a deal that’s mutually beneficial.
  • Offer tickets to your local radio station for giveaways. Radios may charge for the promotional privilege, but if you choose a station whose audience would match yours it can be a great way to reach that specific audience in your local area. Spending that money could be a great investment to increase your ticket sales.
  • You can combine physical and offline promotions. Create a social media contest where they have the opportunity to win tickets by posting a photo of themselves with your physical poster in the wild.

In an increasingly digital world, there are still plenty of options when it comes to marketing your event offline. All of the best marketing strategies combine multiple marketing techniques, advertising your event online and in the real world.

For more ideas on how to market your next event check out our blog here! Updated weekly with feature updates, marketing ideas and industry news!

Charlotte Allkins | Marketing Assistant

Charlotte is the Marketing Assistant for Helm, coming from a design background she loves creating all types of content. Discover more of her blogs, as well as, many others here!

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How To Communicate Your Events Brand Story

How To Communicate Your Events Brand Story

A “brand’s story” has become a huge marketing buzz-phrase in recent years. But how clear are you on what that means? And how you can use it to elevate your event?

When you harness the power of brand storytelling you’ll be able to engage more effectively with your attendees – developing an emotional response to your brand and building a greater level of community.

What does brand storytelling mean?

In basic terms, brand storytelling is about helping your attendees connect emotionally with your event’s brand. It’s about creating a narrative that humanizes what you do and communicates with your audience on a deeper level instead of a purely transactional one.

Brand stories bring your brand to life and give it character. They make it a living, breathing entity with its own ideas and beliefs. They give it its own voice and a distinct way of communicating, and set the tone through which your brand sees the world.

Why should brand storytelling be an important part of your event?

You may be thinking that your tickets have been selling just fine without any real thought towards your brand’s story, so why bother making the effort now? It may be that you have without trying, and created a brand story organically, which is a great start.  The next step is to get this down into a written document so you can clarify all the details of your brand and its ethos. This will ensure consistency across your marketing channels as well as providing an easier onboarding process for any new staff.

If you fall into the category where you feel like you don’t have a distinct brand personality yet, putting the work into developing one can help you stand out within your niche. By creating a clear idea of who you are and what you stand for, it makes it easier for your attendees to understand if you are what they’re looking for.

It goes far beyond just writing a great ‘about us’ section on your website. You have to connect with people’s imaginations when you sell to them and brand storytelling is the perfect tool to allow you to do that.

So where do you start when creating your brand story?

Every brand and event has its own individual story. Below is a list of questions that act as a great starting point for you to think about. You can either write your answers down or if you’re not the event’s creator maybe work on getting an interview with them to get the details of how the event came to be.

  • What led to the creation of the event?
  • When and where was your event launched?
  • What were you doing previously to the event being created?
  • What goals did you set out when you first created the event?
  • Were there any challenges along the way? How did you overcome them?
  • Has your event changed or developed from its creation? If so, how?
  • Who are your event attendees and why do you think they choose your event?
  • Have you reached the goals you previously set out?
  • What would you like to achieve with your event in the future?
  • Do you have any wider values that you consider to be essential to your event?

Creating a clear narrative and timeline gives you an idea of where you’ve been and where you’re heading. It can also help you define your audience more clearly.

Everyone loves a good story, especially one that’s organic and authentic, so if you want your attendees to be more engaged with your events, give them a narrative they can engage with. Put your event attendees at the centre of your brand’s story and you will have their attention.

Help build your brand and event story here with Helm Tickets!

Everyone loves a good story, especially one that’s organic and authentic, so if you want your attendees to be more engaged with your events, give them a narrative they can engage with. Put your event attendees at the center of your brand’s story and you will have their attention.

Help build your brand and event story here with Helm Tickets!

Charlotte Allkins | Marketing Assistant

Charlotte is the Marketing Assistant for Helm, coming from a design background she loves creating all types of content. Discover more of her blogs, as well as, many others here!

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How Video Content Can Help Engage Attendees

How Video Content Can Help Engage Attendees

If you’re not currently using video as part of your marketing strategy then you aren’t alone.

We understand that the thought of creating video content can be an intimidating one, but video is one of the most effective tools in driving customer engagement. 54% of consumers wanted to see more video content from a brand or business they support and 43% of B2C marketers said that pre-produced video is the most successful type of content for marketing purposes. So now’s the time to start prioritizing creating amazing video content!

Video creation doesn’t have to be expensive

It can be expensive to hire out a videographer to film your event and turn that raw footage into perfected final videos. But you don’t always need to hire a videographer to achieve that professional level of video.

High-quality video production has never been cheaper. The camera quality of the latest smartphones has been getting better with each new release, so shooting your own footage is now a far more available option. With a high-quality smartphone camera and a gimbal (non-essential), you can take your shots and edit them in a variety of free video editing programmes.

Only a small number of smaller business and events go to agencies for freelancers to produce their videos. More and more people are turning to DIY techniques to produce great video content on a budget.

Video creation doesn’t have to be time-consuming

Producing professional level video may seem like a huge task, especially if you don’t have a huge marketing team behind you as support. But if you’re already attending your event why not get your phone out and start filming?

As previously mentioned, most modern smartphones have incredible cameras and with an image stabilizing device such as a gimbal, you can easily produce high-quality video content. 

Even if you don’t have enough time to film your whole event, it’s always worth filming short clips to capture the energy of your event to share with attendees and potential future attendees.

If your event day is looking a little hectic, consider taking on a volunteer or a delegate to do some of the filming work or share your event live on social media (e.g. Instagram stories). This footage can be uploaded immediately with little to no editing needed.

Video has a great and tangible return on investment (ROI)

If you want to really see the power of film you need to look into the numbers. When asked which type of content sees the best return on investment (ROI) on social media, the top response in a survey found that it was video marketing. 88% of marketers said that they were satisfied with the ROI of their video marketing on social media.

Adding video to your website as well as your event listing can increase your chances of being the first page on a Google search by a factor of 53, according to MarTech. Forbes also reported that the majority (51.9%) of marketing experts agree that video has the best return on investment of any type of marketing tactic.

Your competitors may already be using video marketing to promote their events and may already be seeing an ROI. If you want to get in on the action and make your event stand out from the rest you can upload a video into your event listing on Helm.

Start using video to promote your next event with Helm Tickets!

Charlotte Allkins | Marketing Assistant

Charlotte is the Marketing Assistant for Helm, coming from a design background she loves creating all types of content. Discover more of her blogs, as well as, many others here!

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Last time we looked at how to get started with an email marketing campaign, including how to create an email marketing strategy and how to build up your email list. If you missed the first part of this series you can find it here. This time we’re taking a look at email marketing best practices and some regulations we recommend you follow.

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Increase Ticket Sales with Email Marketing

Increase Ticket Sales with Email Marketing

91% of consumers check their email every day. But if you’re looking to convert potential attendees from just opening your email to buying a ticket to your event you’ll need to stand out and highlight exactly why they should buy a ticket from you.

To start making email your most influential advertising tool is to understand how you rank against your competition in several key metrics.

To make your event email marketing more effective there are 3 key metrics you’ll need to pay attention to. The open rate, click through rate, and the unsubscribe rate. The average stats for event emails are:

  • 26% of recipients open their event emails
  • 4.95% of recipients click links in their event emails
  • 0.8% of recipients unsubscribe to their event emails

There are several ways you can use these metrics to optimize your event email marketing campaign.

Open rate

The open rate of your emails is the percentage of recipients that opened your email. With an average of 26%, it means out of the number of emails you send marketing your event only 26% will actually open that email. The common range of opens can be between 21-30 %. Music events tend to have a higher rate of opening at around 29% and professional events such as conferences have an open rate of just 23%.

If your current email open rate is below these averages there are several things you can look at to increase the rate of people opening your email.

A good place to look is the subject line of your email. You need to be specific in your message with a sense of urgency. You should use 50 characters or less in your event email subject line. If you’re sharing promotional codes or a save the date email that has a time limit set to it, make sure that’s included in the subject line. For example “25% off ticket price for 24 hours with this code!” If you have the opportunity to include the recipient’s name or city in the subject line this kind of personalization can see an extra 20% in open rates!

It may also be worth looking into the name of the sender of your emails. It might be worth testing sending emails from your company name, from your own name, or maybe even the name of a popular speaker at your event (if applicable and with permission). As well as looking into what time you send your email.

Click Through Rate (CTR)

A normal average click-through rate (CTR, the percentage of people who click a link in your email) for an event email is 4.95% — so just under 5% of people who receive event emails will click on a link in that email. Music events tend to have the best results, with an average CTR of 5.43%, while classes and workshops have just an average a 4.08% CTR.

One of the most effective ways you might be able to increase your click-through rate is to add more links in your event emails and ensure your links are as close to the top of the email as possible. For example, if you have a “Buy Tickets” link at the bottom of your email, add it to the top, or include an alternative link to find out more details on the event.

The best way to develop your CTR is to be more specific with your targeting — with your email list, or your content. A good example is segmenting your email list by geography to reach a more local audience, or sending a discount just to previous event attendees. (If you’re like many Helm Tickets event organizers and use MailChimp for your email marketing campaigns, you can sync your account with Helm to automatically transfer attendee email addresses and other data between systems. Find out more here.)

If you don’t want to narrow down your email lists, it’s worth testing your content to see if one kind is more responsive than another. You can create two versions of your email (version “A” and version “B”). Send version A to one set of subscribers and version B to another more restricted set. Then you can send the better-performing email to the remainder of your email list.

Unsubscribe Rates

The average event email has a rough unsubscribe rate of around 0.8% — so just under 1% of people who receive your event email would unsubscribe from your database. If your rate is above the 1% average, the top of the median range for event emails, it’s worth looking to become more targeted in who you’re sending your emails out to, as well as asking for feedback in a prompt on your unsubscribe page. It’s essential to also be sure to include another communication option on your unsubscribe page. Just because someone doesn’t want to receive your emails doesn’t mean they don’t want to hear from you on Facebook or another channel.

Charlotte Allkins | Marketing Assistant

Charlotte is the Marketing Assistant for Helm, coming from a design background she loves creating all types of content. Discover more of her blogs, as well as, many others here!

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In Part 2 we took at look at the best practices when it comes to email marketing as well as the regulations such as GDPR, if you missed part 2 and are looking for more information on best practices and regulations check it out here.

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Last time we looked at how to get started with an email marketing campaign, including how to create an email marketing strategy and how to build up your email list. If you missed the first part of this series you can find it here. This time we’re taking a look at email marketing best practices and some regulations we recommend you follow.

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Event Page Design Tips

Event Page Design Tips

Your event’s website – specifically the landing page/homepage – is the most critical tool for converting event awareness into converted event attendees. The design of your pages should help achieve this goal with a clear identity and message, an organized information hierarchy and stunning visual imagery. The following tips can help you maximize the effectiveness of your event page using the Helm Tickets event widget.

Brand Identity

Your events landing page (homepage) should embody your brand by showing off your brand’s unique identity. The most effective event ticket pages express this identity with both visual and verbal aspects. By pairing typefaces with simple and clear layouts that help to close a sale with a natural registration process, you create a hierarchy. A design hierarchy is a design that guides a user along a specific path towards a single goal.

Having a good visual hierarchy arranges content into whatever you want the viewer to see first, second, third and so on. You can do this with powerful imagery, contrasting colors, or even relative size of each element on a page. Verbal hierarchies work in a similar way in that you can funnel your information available towards a desired outcome. For example, you could present your essential information first, such as event name, date/time/location, and cost, then follow on with further engaging event details such as any speakers, activities or logistics.

Ensuring a good level of usability is essential when putting together all of these elements on your event ticket page. Be flexible with your layouts and make sure your site loads quickly and is easy to use, especially on mobile. Whilst design is important, it shouldn’t lose any usability.

Brand Message

An events ticketing page messaging works alongside its information hierarchy. Attendees are increasingly searching for greater levels of interactivity, entertainment, and engagement. By creating an effective event page messaging you should be able to support a user-defined experience based on trust, which is a key factor in building return and new attendees.

The design of your page is incredibly important when you look to develop levels of trust between your attendees and the whole event experience. Defining what that experience is with a combination of visual cues as well as descriptive text can help to define what your brand message is.

Keeping your brand message consistent throughout the experience from buying a ticket to the event itself is immensely important. It will help fuel future purchases with a clear message when being referred by word of mouth or social media, as well as then hopefully leading to a more significant conversion rate.

Consistent messaging creates a level of interest by focusing on the event’s brand promise (an incredible experience), which can feed word-of-mouth advertising (social proof, recommendations) and increase conversions (registration, ticket purchases). Delivering on that promise converts attendees into advocates for your brand, developing future engagement and reinforcing the brand—which is particularly significant for recurring events.

Brand Colors

Event ticket pages seek to spark meaningful, tangible, and comprehensive event experiences. They should depend on a palette of three to five emotionally associated colors. Shades of crimson, navy blue, bright gold, deep orange, vivid magenta, or (more frequently) royal or ultraviolet purple are still commanding palettes both in print and on screen.

Vibrant colors provoke an intense experience, but colors associated with specific emotions (cool for precision or tradition, warm for innovation, neon for excitement) can also emphasize that experience. Contrasting colors for body copy, like black text on a white background, make it easy for potential attendees to skim read and get a quick feel for your event without having to struggle to find information.

Brand Type/Fonts

The most educational event ticket pages use copy that’s understandable regardless of its surrounding (literal or figurative) noise. Simple typography and iconography allow convenient navigation, and consistently-applied type supports the brand’s visual signals in any environment. On screen, that means it needs to be highly functional – mostly sans-serif font sets for subheads, body copy, and buttons – followed by a heavier display typefaces or even hand-lettered type for headlines.

As for copy in general, using fewer words (but correct words) is still the practice. Properly layered typography (progressively darkening color shades or descending weights for headers, subheads, body copy, etc.) will contrast well for more important content like detailed programme descriptions or guest speaker information.

Brand Images

Captivating brand imagery will strengthen any event tickets page’s brand, message, and call to action. Professional photography fairly dominates a significant amount of large conferences, concerts, and festival pages—but many events of varying sizes may also use interchangeable imagery. These illustrations or icons may arise throughout the site, either as a latent wallpaper or overtly associated with particular event features or actions.

For banners or other hero-level imagery, several brands are dialling back their aesthetic imagery in favor of more dynamic and engaging content (social media walls or video reels). Visually, that means simpler logos with fewer colors (if not completely all-one color) and subtler placement are becoming key. The most common occurrence of this is white logos (or text, or icons) overlaying wildly colorful imagery or video.

Whether your event ticket page uses photography or illustration, it’s always best to hire a professional. This will help you to stand out from thousands of amateur Facebook banners or badly lit photographs of surprised or unprepared people. Creative professionals can always make the most of less-than-ideal conditions, so your next events imagery can be more engaging and shareable!

Charlotte Allkins | Marketing Assistant

Charlotte is the Marketing Assistant for Helm, coming from a design background she loves creating all types of content. Discover more of her blogs, as well as, many others here!

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Last time we looked at how to get started with an email marketing campaign, including how to create an email marketing strategy and how to build up your email list. If you missed the first part of this series you can find it here. This time we’re taking a look at email marketing best practices and some regulations we recommend you follow.

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The Importance Of Great Event Photography

The Importance Of Great Event Photography

Having great event photography can take your event promotion to the next level.

Whilst the added time and effort may not initially seem like the wisest investment, having amazing quality images will make advertizing and promoting your next event a thousand times easier in the long run.

Despite camera phones upping their game over the last few years, to really capture the feel of your event and to have professional level advertizing content, it’s still essential to hire an experienced professional if you want to have clear, compelling images.

Here are a few of our top tips to ensure your next event has the best images possible.

Booking a photographer

Hiring an experienced event photographer is incredibly important. If you Google event photographers in your area you’re sure to find hundreds of photographers, so it may be worth reaching out to people you know and seeing if they have any recommendations. If you’re using a venue they also may be able to supply you with several suppliers they’ve used in the past. Give yourself plenty of time to find the right photographer for your event.

Take a deeper look into their work through their website: for example, galleries, testimonials, experience, if they have any specialities, and their pricing. If they’ve frequently worked on events similar to yours or previously worked at the venue they’d be able to provide you with the most effective images.

Try and find a photographer whose style would suit your event’s promotional needs as well as your budget. Always ensure you agree on a fee upfront and what exactly that fee will cover in terms of time, scope, editing and supply of the images.

Once you’ve found a photographer you’re happy with you’ll need to ensure they’re fully briefed on exactly what you need from them. Make sure there’s a safe place for them to leave their equipment, such as a lockable cupboard or office space, and make sure they have appropriate access to the part of your venue you need photographing.

Also make sure they’re easily identifiable as the official event photographer(s). This makes sure you know what you’re paying for and ensures they don’t get too hijacked by guests looking for photos!

Writing an appropriate brief

Writing a brief can seem a daunting and time-consuming task. However, the long term payoff of having a clearly written brief ensures your photographer will be able to do the best job they can for you. Make sure you take the time to discuss what you want from them before the event as well as on arrival – this way you can deal with any last minute opportunities or concerns.

The images from your event should have a clear narrative and tell the story of your event. Include pre-event shots to show the set up of your event and build hype for it,  followed by plenty of images of attendees arriving and people interacting with your event. Depending on what your event is, you may want to include images of people watching a demonstration or presentation, your attendees sampling something, or talking to others at the event. The key sentiments you want to be able to convey are your attendees enjoying themselves, celebrating, learning, and interacting. This will grow the levels of trust and engagement for possible future attendees.

Have a good mixture of close-up and broader shots, as well as a mix of candid and posed shots. This is necessary to ensure you have a good variety of material to work with in the future. Some of these shots will be more appropriate for use on social media and some may be more appropriate for use on marketing and promotional materials. Having images that convey emotion can sometimes be more effective than getting action shots, so aim to get a good level of reaction shots to your event. Put together a list of essential shots as well as some that are more abstract and give your photographer the opportunity to be creative on the day too!

The brief itself should include:

  • Audience and purpose: it’s essential to get images of your audience interacting with your event but it’s also a good idea to think about who you’ll be putting that image in front of and what they’d want to see to encourage them to buy a ticket to your next event. Are the images for social media? Are they for a press release? Are they for stakeholders? Or maybe for your next brochure or advert?

    There can sometimes be several audiences you want to target, so it’s important to remember this when writing out your image list.
  • Branding: if you have a set of brand guidelines it may be worth supplying those to your photographer so they get a good feel and understanding of your brand and are better able to create images that accurately reflect it.
  • Know the event: the more information your event you can supply your photographer, the better. If you have an event programme or guide it may be worth sending this to them in advance so that they can plan out their time to make sure they’re able to get all the shots you need in the allotted time.

    Once arriving at the event it may be worth showing them around so that they know where they’re going and can be more effective in how they spend their time at your event. If there are any VIPs or specific people you need plenty of photos of, make sure  you introduce them in advance so there’s no confusion and it makes it easier for both the photographer and the person of interest.
  • Key moments: let your photographer know in advance the key moments of your event that you want capturing. Creating a timetable of these moments may be really useful in timings for your photographer as well as making it easier to create a short list.
  • Timings: prior to your event it’s important to agree both how and when they’re going to supply you with the images. It’d be useful if at some point during the event you receive a few images to be used across all communications whilst the event is still live, and enough to use immediately after the event for ‘round up’ emails and press releases. The remaining images can then be scheduled to be delivered depending on when you need them.

Permissions

Generally, you don’t need to get permission to photograph large groups of people at public events, provided the images won’t be used out of context or aren’t likely to cause distress or harm. However, if minors are present, you’ll need to get parental consent for the child to be photographed.

Despite the fact you generally need permission, it’s advised that you highlight that there will be a photographer present at your event and have a procedure in place for those who are unhappy having their photo taken. Many events include opting into having the attendees’ photo taken as a condition of admission into the event, depending on the type of event and audience.

At Helm Tickets we want to make sure you make the most out of your event and set yourself up to have even greater success at your next event. Finding a great event photographer and using the images to promote and share your event is incredibly important and we hope these tips will make the process that little bit easier! 

Promote your event more effectively with Helm Tickets!

Charlotte Allkins | Marketing Assistant

Charlotte is the Marketing Assistant for Helm, coming from a design background she loves creating all types of content. Discover more of her blogs, as well as, many others here!

POPULAR POSTS

Basics of Email Marketing – Part 3

In Part 2 we took at look at the best practices when it comes to email marketing as well as the regulations such as GDPR, if you missed part 2 and are looking for more information on best practices and regulations check it out here.

Basics of Email Marketing – Part 2

Last time we looked at how to get started with an email marketing campaign, including how to create an email marketing strategy and how to build up your email list. If you missed the first part of this series you can find it here. This time we’re taking a look at email marketing best practices and some regulations we recommend you follow.

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