Basics of Email Marketing – Part 2

Basics of Email Marketing – Part 2

Last time we looked at how to get started with an email marketing campaign, including how to create an email marketing strategy and how to build up your email list. If you missed the first part of this series you can find it here. This time we’re taking a look at email marketing best practices and some regulations we recommend you follow. 

Email marketing best practices

Once you’ve built up your email list full of loyal subscribers it’s important to make sure your emails don’t end up in a spam folder or worse, on a blocked list.

Here are a few important things to keep in mind before you start sending out information to your email list:

Email marketing tips

While you probably wouldn’t think twice about the formatting or subject line of an email you send to a friend, email marketing requires a lot more thought and consideration. Everything from the time you send to your email to the devices which your email could be opened on matter, and should be planned.

The goal of email marketing is to generate more leads and increase your ticket sales. This is what makes creating marketing emails a far more involved process than your average one.

The components of a successful marketing email include: 

  • Copy: The copy in the body of your email should be consistent with your voice and stick to only one topic.
  • Images: Choose images that are eye-catching and relevant and optimized for all devices.
  • CTA: Your call to action should lead to a relevant offer and stand out from the rest of your email.
  • Timing: Based on various studies the best time apparently to email is 11 am on a Tuesday. 
  • Responsiveness: On average, around 55% of emails are opened on mobile, so your email should be optimized for this as well as other devices
  • Personalization: You should write every email as if you’re writing it to a friend. Be personable and address your reader in a familiar tone.
  • Subject line: Your subject line should be clear, actionable, and use enticing language that’s personalized and aligned with the body copy of the email.

Email segmentation

Segmentation means breaking up your email list into subcategories that relate to your subscribers’ unique characteristics, interests and preferences.

You need to remember that your audience and your subscribers are human and you should always do your best to treat them as such. (That means not sending out generic email blasts!)

The reason email segmentation is important is without it you can run the risk of sending the wrong kind of content to the wrong people and potentially lose subscribers.

Why you should segment your email list

Each person who signs up to your emails is at a different stage of readiness to convert into ticket buyers (which we’re assuming is your goal).

If you send a discount code for your tickets to subscribers that aren’t interested in attending your latest event due to location/previous commitments etc. you’ll probably lose them. This is because you have skipped the part where you build trust and develop the relationship between you and your audience.

Every email you send should treat your subscribers like humans that you want to connect with, instead of a group of leads you’re trying to fit into the same box.

The greater the level of segmentation in your list, the greater the level of trust you’ll be able to build with your leads, and the easier it’ll be to convert them at a later date.

How to segment your email list

To begin to segment your email list you’ll need to create a variety of lead magnets and opt-in forms (click here for more information on these) that cover each part of the ticket buyers’ journey. This means your contacts will automatically be divided into separate lists.

The majority of email marketing platforms allow you to segment your email list by contact data and behavior that will help you send the right emails to the right people.

There are several ways you could break up your list including:

  • Geographical location
  • Lifecycle stage
  • Awareness, consideration and decision stage
  • Industry
  • Previous engagement with your brand
  • Language
  • Job title

In most cases, you can segment your list in any way you wish, but it’s important to be as exclusive as possible when sending emails to each individual subgroup.

Personalization

Now you’ve established who you’re emailing and what’s important to them, it will be far easier to send emails with plenty of personalized touches.

You’ll know you’re speaking to potentially hundreds and thousands of people, but your subscribers don’t need to know or feel that.

Studies have shown that personalized emails have a 26% higher open rate and an improved click-through rate of 14% when compared to non-personalised.

Once you have all your personalized data and you’ve set your email marketing platform that allows for personalization, there’s no excuse to send out generic emails that don’t make your leads and audience feel special.

A few great ways to personalize your emails include: 

  • Adding in their first name into the subject line or intro greeting
  • Include region-specific information (great for running local events)
  • Only sending emails that are relevant to the last engagement the lead has had with your brand
  • Information about personal events like public holidays or birthdays
  • Ending your emails with a personal signature from a human, not your business
  • A relevant call to action for an offer your audience may find useful

Email Regulations

Email regulations are consistent with consumers’ desires to know how and why their information is being used. One of the most important factors in email marketing is complying with what your audience wants and is looking for.

CAN-SPAM Compliance

CAN-SPAM stands for ‘Controlling the Assault of Non-Solicited Pornography and Marketing’ (because sometimes the two go together).

It’s the way to protect your subscribers’ right to only receive emails they’ve requested.

The law was passed in 2003 and applies to any commercial emails used for business purposes.

To ensure your emails are CAN-SPAM compliant you need to make sure you:

  1. Include your company/event name in the address of every email
  2. Place visible unsubscribe link within your emails
  3. Use real email addresses in the “from” and “reply to” fields
  4. Write subject lines that indicate the contents of the email

If you’re still unsure about CAN-SPAM there are plenty of resources online for further information.

GDPR Compliance

While there was some controversy when GDPR was first brought in, it actually moves you closer to building long-lasting and trusting relationships with your audience.

GDPR is about giving your audience the right to choose. They choose your emails. They choose to hear updates from you. They choose to buy your event tickets. This is exactly what inbound marketing is about: your customers coming to you because they believe your business and event hold value to them.

GDPR only applies to businesses that operate in the European Union and market to EU citizens. Non-compliance will result in large fees that aren’t worth the risk, so it’s best to read up on GDPR to ensure you are fully compliant.

Here’s a brief overview of how you can comply with GDPR laws:

  • Use explicit and clear language when requesting consent to store personal information.
  • Only collect contact data that’s necessary for and relevant to your business.
  • Store contact data in a secure manner and only use it for the agreed-upon purpose.
  • Retain data for justifiable business purposes only.
  • Delete contact data on request.
  • Make it easy for contacts to unsubscribe from your list or update their preferences.
  • Comply promptly to a contact’s request for access to their data.
  • Keep company records to prove GDPR compliance.

These regulations should be taken seriously, so it’s a good idea to create a GDPR-compliant strategy for your business before you begin sending out emails.

How to avoid spam filters

After spending your time creating your perfect email and adhering to regulations, the last thing you want is to end up in a spam folder! 

You want to avoid the spam folder because: 

  • It will hurt your deliverability across the board
  • Your contacts will miss your emails
  • You won’t be able to accurately measure your marketing effectiveness
  • Your analytics will be wrong

Some of the best ways to avoid being sent to the spam filter are:

  • Getting whitelisted: A whitelist is the opposite of a blacklist, meaning it’s a list of approved senders that are allowed to reach a subscriber’s inbox. The best way to do this is asking your new subscriber to add your email address to their address book. Include directions on how to do this in your welcome email.
  • Watch your copy: Avoid using all capital letters and multiple exclamation points, as well as spam trigger words, like ‘opt in’, ‘click below’ and ‘order’. These words are easily detected and marked down by Internet Service Providers (ISPs).
  • Use a reliable email service provider: Your email service provider’s reputation affects how your emails are delivered, so it’s always best to stick to established and well-known companies for an added level of legitimacy.
  • Implement a double opt-in: After someone opts into your email list, send an email asking them to confirm. This ensures that your new subscriber is genuinely interested in your emails and will likely be more engaged.

These are essential steps to making sure your emails are trusted and compliant and will help your audience build trust with your business and your event.

Next time we’ll be looking at how you can keep track and analyze your email marketing results to help make your campaigns as efficient as possible. Keep up to date via our blog as well as on LinkedIn!

Market your event via email more effectively with Helm Tickets!

Charlotte Allkins | Marketing Assistant

Charlotte is the Marketing Assistant for Helm, coming from a design background she loves creating all types of content. Discover more of her blogs, as well as, many others here!

POPULAR POSTS

Basics of Email Marketing – Part 2

Last time we looked at how to get started with an email marketing campaign, including how to create an email marketing strategy and how to build up your email list. If you missed the first part of this series you can find it here. This time we’re taking a look at email marketing best practices and some regulations we recommend you follow.

Basics of Email Marketing – Part 1

Email marketing may seem a fairly old school method of marketing your next event in a world full of messaging and social media channels, but it’s still one of the most effective ways to get in front of your target audience and get results.

GET Monthly EMAIL UPDATES

GET Monthly EMAIL UPDATES

Basics of Email Marketing – Part 1

Basics of Email Marketing – Part 1

Email marketing may seem a fairly old school method of marketing your next event in a world full of messaging and social media channels, but it’s still one of the most effective ways to get in front of your target audience and get results.

Email marketing is one of the few ways you can build up an authentic connection with your audience that help keep your event alive. It doesn’t need to be spam or come across as a personal note between friends. It has its own unique identity. Your audience won’t have given you their contact details lightly and if you manage to create the right tone you’ll not only be building up a relationship between you and your attendees but also building a great profit creation tool.

You can build on any existing relationships with your audience, subscribers, and leads by providing them with relevant and valuable information that will help them with their ticket buying process.

The most important thing to remember with email marketing is that it isn’t about you, it’s about your audience.

If you always keep this rule in your head when writing your messages to your subscribers, they’ll not only be more likely to open your emails but will look forward to receiving your updates.

How to get started

Creating an email marketing campaign can be broken down into a few key steps.

 

  1. Define your audience: If you want to create an effective email it needs to be a relevant email. Like all marketing, you need to start with your buyer persona. Think about what your attendees and audience are looking for from you and tailor your message from there.
  2. Set your goals: There’s plenty of information out there about industry averages for setting goals for your campaign. You can set goals for open rates (where they open your email) or even click-through rates (if they click on a relevant link in your email). Once you’ve picked your goal you’ll now have something to work towards.
  3. Create a way to sign-up: You’ll need to create an email list. If you need help doing this, or even if you’re starting from scratch you can find out more details here. If you have an email list ready to go, you’ll still need to create several ways for new people to subscribe to your emails. Email lists can take a while to build up, so don’t be discouraged if you don’t see a huge amount of sign-ups straight away. Treat each and every subscriber like gold and you’ll soon see your email list grow.
  4. Choose an email campaign type: There are a lot of options you can choose from, whether you want to send out a weekly update, or just announcements for your event. It’s best to have a campaign type in mind so you can plan out what you’re looking to share with your audience.
  5. Make a schedule: After you’ve selected your campaign type it’s important to put together a schedule of when you want to contact your audience. This will depend on the campaign type you’ve chosen. Inform your audience upfront about what to expect and stick to a consistent schedule, as this will help build trust as well as making sure they don’t forget about you!
  6. Measure your results: When marketing anything you’ll also need to measure everything. This is how you’ll know what’s working and what isn’t. Keeping an eye on all these small details will ensure that you can make the most out of your efforts and see great results.

Build up that email list

There are many creative ways you can build up your email list – check out our previous blog here on how to build up your list effectively. Traditionally, there are two key ways to build up your email list: lead magnets and opt-in forms.

 

  • Lead magnets: A lead magnet is pretty much as it sounds. It attracts potential email subscribers to your email list, usually in the form of an offer. The offer can be anything relevant to your event and should be valuable to your audience.

    In recent years people have been increasingly protective over their personal information, so you’ll need to make sure your offer is super relevant and valuable, as their personal information is just as valuable to you.

    Your lead magnet should be actionable, easy to consume, be relevant to any future content you wish to publish, and be a stepping stone to ticket purchase.
  • Opt-in forms: Your opt-in form will need to be attention grabbing if you’re looking to get your audience to give you their personal information. It’s the gate between you and your future leads and can be an incredible asset to your marketing toolkit.

    The form should be simple and set up in a way that it offers double confirmation of your intent to market to that person. Don’t set up too many fields to fill in – generally just a name and email will be enough.

    Make sure the process flows. Take yourself through the experience several times so you get a real feel for your users’ experience. This is one of the first impressions you’ll give your audience so it’s important to make sure it’s a positive one.

Email marketing can be highly effective when done right, and we at Helm are here to help you through the process. In our next blog, we’ll be taking a look at best practice for email marketing, as well as the regulations you should follow. Keep up to date via our blog as well as on LinkedIn!

Market your event via email more effectively with Helm Tickets!

Charlotte Allkins | Marketing Assistant

Charlotte is the Marketing Assistant for Helm, coming from a design background she loves creating all types of content. Discover more of her blogs, as well as, many others here!

POPULAR POSTS

Basics of Email Marketing – Part 2

Last time we looked at how to get started with an email marketing campaign, including how to create an email marketing strategy and how to build up your email list. If you missed the first part of this series you can find it here. This time we’re taking a look at email marketing best practices and some regulations we recommend you follow.

Basics of Email Marketing – Part 1

Email marketing may seem a fairly old school method of marketing your next event in a world full of messaging and social media channels, but it’s still one of the most effective ways to get in front of your target audience and get results.

GET Monthly EMAIL UPDATES

GET Monthly EMAIL UPDATES

How MTV Music Week Helped Tackle The Stigma Around Mental Health

How MTV Music Week Helped Tackle The Stigma Around Mental Health

Mental health as a whole has rightfully taken front of stage in recent years. With an increased focus on mental wellbeing alongside physical health, we’re beginning to see a social change in attitude towards mental health and we’re starting to remove the stigma that goes with mental health issues.

The music industry has a reputation for being “volatile and competitive”. A recent survey found that around 80% of musicians suffer with stress, anxiety and depression. Whilst the music industry offers many brilliant opportunities and once in a lifetime experiences, there’s often been a struggle to balance the positives and negatives within the industry, with musicians finding they’re subject to massive highs as well as deep lows.

However, there’s also an increasingly powerful movement to help support those having a less positive experience or struggling with mental health issues in the business. MTV hosted the event – A State of Mind – during their celebration of the music industry, MTV Music Week 2019 in Plymouth. The event focussed on the increasing pressure to succeed and stand out in the music industry, with artists offering their insights into managing the highs and lows of the business.

This event featured panelists who are striving to create a more balanced experience in the industry, including Danny Angove – Red Light Management & One on One, Joe Hastings – Head of Health & Welfare, Help Musicians UK and Pete Falloon – singer-songwriter, and co-founder of Sound Mind Sessions.

Sound Mind Sessions are a new live acoustic music and mental health project that Pete Falloon and Pik Rawlings formed in 2018. The sessions aim to provide beautiful original music in stunning Devon venues, raise awareness of mental health issues in the music industry and raise funds to support places for musicians on mental health first aid courses.

Pete’s goal for Sound Mind Sessions is to “help develop a more resilient and supportive Devon music community and to fund future events and roll out the model across Devon.” They’re doing this by opening by the conversation around mental health in the South West.

Pete explained the logistics of running the platform, “As well as funding the Mental Health First Aid course places mentioned above, we provide flyers and cards on Music Minds Matter and the Help Musicians helpline at our shows. We regularly repost and share mental wellbeing related materials on our social media channels, and have great links with local press, radio and news websites who share our stories and news. Most of our support team who work with us in putting on Sound Mind Sessions shows are also trained Mental Health First Aiders, and able to provide support to those attending our concerts and more widely.”

The music industry is an incredible one, but not without its challenges. These challenges can make or break aspiring artists or those looking for another route into the business. Pete has witnessed these challenges first-hand and how they can affect mental health.

“Anxiety and depression are not uncommon, and often related to the nature of the job. Performing can be an emotional rollercoaster: great when it’s working well, terrible when it’s not, and sometimes the big ‘high’ that comes from a great gig can end in a big ‘low’, too.”

These emotions can stretch far beyond how it feels to perform, as there can be far greater challenges out of individuals’ control that can affect mental health and leave people in the industry needing greater levels of support. Pete says, “Job security is a very real challenge and puts financial pressures on musicians, and the working hours can be exhausting and difficult for relationships and family life. While social media and the rapidly connected, online world provide great opportunities for sharing music and promotion, there are also issues associated with that, and many musicians struggle to get recognized.”  

We spoke to Pete further about how speaking at an event like MTV Music Week opens up the topic to a larger audience for discussion. He believes “it’s critically important that big music institutions like MTV promote the importance of mental health and wellbeing. What we are trying to do with  Sound Mind Sessions is very much grassroots, at the level of performers, and new and emerging acts. But the music business is led by the big institutions and music companies, and most musicians would be aspiring to improve, grow and develop towards wider exposure, airplay, contracts, sales, streams, live opportunities and so on. So we need a top-down recognition of mental health issues at a high level, and an understanding of the pressures and challenges that musicians face, as well as the support needed.”

Pete was clear that these events can really make a difference when it comes to helping people in the industry with their mental health. “Absolutely yes! It’s widely recognized that simply talking about mental health is a major step towards supporting those who suffer mental health issues. Talking brings it out in the open, and makes it feel safer for others to talk about their issues too. We’ve found that songwriters performing at Sound Mind Sessions are often happy to talk about their life experiences and what’s behind their songs as part of their performances. In turn, this has created a safe environment where members of the audience have begun to discuss challenges in their lives. The other side, of course, is simply awareness raising, which both Sound Mind Sessions and the MTV event are doing a great job of!”

Pete is one of three panelists speaking at the State of Mind event and he’s thrilled to be involved. “It’s a real honor to be asked to take part in something put on by such a music giant, and at the same time to be able to talk a bit more about something I  am really passionate about, and hopefully to be part of a growing solution and support network. On a personal level, many of my musical heroes played MTV Unplugged shows, so it’s just fantastic for me to be involved.”

We asked if more events like these were held at larger events and festivals, would this help those struggling with their mental health. Pete said,

“Totally yes – the more widely these kinds of events are held, the more mental health issues in music will be recognised and understood, and hopefully we will learn how to work towards a more resilient, understanding and supportive future!”

Running an event like this during MTV Music Week opened up the subject to a wider audience and helps to remove the stigma around mental health. In May many businesses and industries recognized Mental Health Awareness Month to help their employees know where to find support if they need it. However, if we’re ever going to break the stigma, mental health needs to be recognized throughout the year, and that level of understanding and support for those are struggling needs to be maintained.

Charlotte Allkins | Marketing Assistant

Charlotte is the Marketing Assistant for Helm, coming from a design background she loves creating all types of content. Discover more of her blogs, as well as, many others here!

POPULAR POSTS

Basics of Email Marketing – Part 2

Last time we looked at how to get started with an email marketing campaign, including how to create an email marketing strategy and how to build up your email list. If you missed the first part of this series you can find it here. This time we’re taking a look at email marketing best practices and some regulations we recommend you follow.

Basics of Email Marketing – Part 1

Email marketing may seem a fairly old school method of marketing your next event in a world full of messaging and social media channels, but it’s still one of the most effective ways to get in front of your target audience and get results.

GET Monthly EMAIL UPDATES

GET Monthly EMAIL UPDATES

How to create an email list for your event

How to create an email list for your event

Putting together an email list may seem like a daunting task, but it’s an essential component to running a successful marketing campaign for your event.

Email lists are perfect for encouraging attendees to return to future events you may run as well as informing new subscribers of events coming up.

Re-engaging previous attendees of your event is a valuable long term solution for increasing revenue and sustainable growth, as it can cost up to five times as much to attract a new attendee than retain an existing one.

Creating an effective emailing list is perfect for building customer loyalty by creating quality content. Whilst there are many ways of building customer loyalty, email marketing is one of the most powerful ways to reach your target audience. People will subscribe to your email because they’ll believe they hold value.

If you’re starting from the very beginning, building an impressive list can feel like an impossible task. So here we’ll cover some quality methods of building up a list from scratch.

How to build an email list from scratch:

Create a custom call to action (CTA) for each landing page or blog:

Personalized CTAs have a 42% higher view-to-submission rate than CTAs that are the same for all visitors. Which is almost double your potential email subscribers.

People who find your blog or a specific page on your website will have been looking for something specific, so it makes sense that your CTA should also be specific and relevant to meet their needs. For example, if you were looking for event marketing techniques, it would make sense for the CTA to read “Subscribe here for more event marketing techniques”.

Of course, these are only effective if you have the resources to create this quality content, but this process doesn’t have to be complicated, time-consuming or expensive. Some ideas of things you could offer include a fun quiz, an exclusive blog or article, or even just updates on future events or content.

If you offer content directly related to your attendees’ needs, your email newsletter won’t feel like a constant advert. Instead, it will be valuable and helpful, which is key for long-term attendee retention.

Create a pop up for each page or blog on your site:

Whilst a pop-up may seem initially annoying, there are now far more effective and less intrusive ways of prompting website visitors to sign up to your email list.

You can create carefully timed pop-up ads or on-site retargeting. A user can receive a pop-up after they spend a specific amount of time on a page. This could offer content that’s relevant either to the page or to their behavior on the site. Examples of this are exit pop-ups that appear when a user tries to leave the page or scroll pop-ups that appear when a user reaches a specific point on the page.

Pop-ups don’t have to be gimmicky or annoying. If done right, you’ll be able to appeal to your visitors with quality content when and where they need it.

Create a pop-up survey:

Most people don’t visit a website looking for the newsletter sign up form. You need to gain their trust and get them to engage with your content and your event before you present them with a request for their email.

To build your list, you may want to reach out to visitors on specific pages with surveys that are related to that specific content. People tend to be more willing to answer a quick “A or B” question survey if they already feel invested in the content.

If you plan on using this technique we recommend you wait around 10 seconds for your pop-up to appear as this should mean they’re engaging with or reading your content, so in theory, they’re more primed to sign up for emails from a direct source.

Keep it simple. Ask them a question and ask them to include an email address to submit their answer and then they’re done! Remember you do need to ask them whether they’re happy to receive marketing content and emails, but this can be a simple checkbox above the submit button.

Use humor to help give your event and brand a human element:

We’re all so used to seeing so many “yes or no” offers on websites that we often no longer notice them. To help grow your email list, inject some personality and humor into the language you use, as this is a great way of reminding your audience that there’s a human behind the site. This builds that essential trust.

You can create a CTA that’s specific to your event and your audience that will make people hesitate before clicking the “no, thanks”. It’s easy to click no when you ask “do you want to sign up for emails?” But when you ask something more specific to their needs, it becomes a little harder to say no. For example, if you have a key headline act at your event that you know your audience enjoys, ask “Do you want to see X?”

Whilst your audience may still say no, it’s worth testing what works best for your audience and giving them the opportunity to hesitate on your offer.

Make sure your CTA contains value:

The language used in the CTA itself is an important part of making it valuable.

To truly optimize your sign-ups, you don’t actually want to use too many phrases such as “sign up here” or “subscribe” as this can be off-putting for a potential sign up as this language is often associated with junk mail. Instead, you want to focus on using phrases such as “Download”, “Featured”, “Exclusive” and “Access”.

This automatically puts a premium on your content and makes your audience feel they’re gaining access to something that is truly exclusive and specifically for them.

For example, say “ Download our exclusive line up preview here” and then include an email subscription form to access that content. This CTA makes it clear that there’s value to gain from providing your email address.

Your website visitors need to hear how they’ll benefit from providing you with their email address and how this exclusive content isn’t available on your site. The emails need to offer something special otherwise what’s the point?

Promote your newsletter on your social media and email signature:

Even if you don’t have a long list of email subscribers, this doesn’t mean you don’t have an existing network. If you have a following on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram, use these connections to help you build your email list.

You can pitch your email list on site, where they already know and like you, so giving them an option to follow you further may go down quite well.

If you don’t feel comfortable pitching on social media or don’t feel like you have a large enough following, you can always consider adding it to your email signature. The link can go directly to your email newsletter or it could link to a blog post or landing page that contains one of the pre-mentioned pop-ups.

On a daily basis, you probably communicate with a diverse range of people that are already gaining value from your personal emails, so they may be interested in exploring your events in more depth if given the option.

Create landing pages with a specific message:

Industry research has shown an increase in potential leads when you increase the number of landing pages on your site.

Creating individual and personalized landing pages allow you to appeal to a wider demographic. Every person who visits your site about your event will be looking for something different and specific to their needs, so the more landing pages you can create to answer each person’s individual concerns, the greater chance you have of gaining sign-ups to your events newsletter.

Include a CTA on your ‘About’ page:

Your ‘About’ page on your website is one of the most important pages in terms of email sign up potential.

This page is there to prime visitors who want to learn more about your event, but it may not be enough to convince them to buy a ticket. A well placed CTA on the page can encourage them to sign up to your newsletter that will provide them with additional information, potentially leading to future ticket sales.

Creating an email list from scratch doesn’t have to be hard or time-consuming. By using just a few of these techniques you can begin to grow your own loyal following for your event.

For more advice on how to effectively market your event keep an eye on our blog!

Charlotte Allkins | Marketing Assistant

Charlotte is the Marketing Assistant for Helm, coming from a design background she loves creating all types of content. Discover more of her blogs, as well as, many others here!

POPULAR POSTS

Basics of Email Marketing – Part 2

Last time we looked at how to get started with an email marketing campaign, including how to create an email marketing strategy and how to build up your email list. If you missed the first part of this series you can find it here. This time we’re taking a look at email marketing best practices and some regulations we recommend you follow.

Basics of Email Marketing – Part 1

Email marketing may seem a fairly old school method of marketing your next event in a world full of messaging and social media channels, but it’s still one of the most effective ways to get in front of your target audience and get results.

GET Monthly EMAIL UPDATES

GET Monthly EMAIL UPDATES

Offline Event Marketing Ideas

Offline Event Marketing Ideas

For many businesses and events, digital marketing is key. Online ads and social media marketing have become incredibly accurate, and act as a measurable tool for reaching the target audience of your event.

But what if you want to create something real? Something more tangible?

To keep your event and its brand at the front of your audience’s mind, you can cover an entire spectrum of marketing techniques, including complimenting your digital marketing efforts with offline marketing campaigns.

There’s still an abundance of ways to engage with your local audience and regional fans in a tangible way. Here are a few great ways to start:

Be where your fans are

When creating a physical offline marketing campaign it’s always important to think about not just how you’re going to reach your fans and audience, but also where you’ll reach them.

For example, if you’re running a punk rock gig, are there any shops or bars you think your audience might go to? You could consider targeting tattoo parlors or skate shops, or anywhere that might play music similar to yours. It’s about hitting the locations that suit your niche.

By doing a bit of research you’ll be able to get in front of your potential audience in an organic way. You won’t just be reaching out to their existing customers, they’ll also be reaching yours.

Great design creates excitement

Creating posters and flyers has always been an essential part of event promotion and they can still be incredibly effective alongside a digital campaign. Having a well-designed poster can set the tone of your event and is a great tool to communicate with your potential audience visually.

They can inform and motivate ticket buyers and become a part of your event’s physical history.

There are  2 things you’ll need to consider when creating your flyers and posters:

  1. Design: What kind of emotion and message do you want to convey? Punk? Corporate? Professional? Handmade? You can use this design on all your physical marketing materials as well as your online campaigns. This ensures your event branding is consistent and instantly recognizable.
  2. Distribution: Posting your flyers on telephones poles won’t quite be enough. You need your posters and flyers to be exactly where your potential audience will be.

You can even use social media to reach out to brands or businesses that share an audience with you and ask if they’d be happy sharing your posters and flyers on your behalf, creating a partnership with them.

Offer meet and greets

If you have a well-known speaker or artist performing at your event, you have the potential to hold VIP meet and greet experiences at your venue. It’s great to do this in advance of your event, as it acts as an effective way to reach and engage your audience and generate excitement for your event. It’s also a great opportunity to sell tickets!

If you do manage to secure a partnership with any local businesses you could reach out to them and see if they’d be interested in holding the meet and greet at their location. This way you’re being where your fans are and it’s mutually beneficial to both you and your partner.

Create a contest with ticket giveaways

Nothing gets people quite as excited as a freebie does! Contests are not only a great way to promote your event, but also act as a great way to engage with your audience.

  • You can use your potential partners by doing ticket giveaways that require visiting their place of business. Or create a prize that’s a combination of your tickets and maybe a gift card (or similar) prize from your partner. Once again creating a deal that’s mutually beneficial.
  • Offer tickets to your local radio station for giveaways. Radios may charge for the promotional privilege, but if you choose a station whose audience would match yours it can be a great way to reach that specific audience in your local area. Spending that money could be a great investment to increase your ticket sales.
  • You can combine physical and offline promotions. Create a social media contest where they have the opportunity to win tickets by posting a photo of themselves with your physical poster in the wild.

In an increasingly digital world, there are still plenty of options when it comes to marketing your event offline. All of the best marketing strategies combine multiple marketing techniques, advertising your event online and in the real world.

For more ideas on how to market your next event check out our blog here! Updated weekly with feature updates, marketing ideas and industry news!

Charlotte Allkins | Marketing Assistant

Charlotte is the Marketing Assistant for Helm, coming from a design background she loves creating all types of content. Discover more of her blogs, as well as, many others here!

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Basics of Email Marketing – Part 2

Last time we looked at how to get started with an email marketing campaign, including how to create an email marketing strategy and how to build up your email list. If you missed the first part of this series you can find it here. This time we’re taking a look at email marketing best practices and some regulations we recommend you follow.

Basics of Email Marketing – Part 1

Email marketing may seem a fairly old school method of marketing your next event in a world full of messaging and social media channels, but it’s still one of the most effective ways to get in front of your target audience and get results.

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Organiser Spotlight – Breaking into the music industry with MTV

Organiser Spotlight – Breaking into the music industry with MTV

MTV Music Week is turning the traditional festival format on its head with various locations across the city of Plymouth. The 4-day festival will be celebrating not just the music itself but the industry around it, exploring how it impacts art, technology, social media and everything in between. Focusing on curated events aimed at those who are interested in breaking into the music industry, as well as an array of exciting live music events.

Throughout modern history, there have been a number of events that have been said to change the music industry or at least altered the course it was on. In recent years it would appear that “popular” music seemed to change daily, if not by the hour. There are so many avenues to obtain and produce music now it can become overwhelming. One of the most influential catalysts for producing a whole new overhaul of the music industry was the creation and launch of MTV.

Music became infinitely more accessible due to MTV’s creation. It became a part of people’s homes during the ’80s. Music was no longer solely about a band’s technical ability, but about their live performances and on-stage presence. To this day, performing for MTV is still a highly sought after experience because of the doors it can open for up and coming musicians, as well as those more established.

One of the incredible musicians performing at MTV Music Week for their MTV Push Live event is Hamzaa. A singer-songwriter hailing from East London, she is breathing life back into the resurging R&B scene. She brings a level of depth and honesty to her music that resonates with her audiences. Her ability to seamlessly weave her smooth vocals with catchy guitar riffs makes her a hidden gem in the music industry.

She describes the importance and excitement of being able to perform at MTV Music Week, “I am excited to be part of it because I grew up watching MTV, that’s where I was finding new songs. I am glad to be a part of something that was really important to me when discovering music. “  

A huge part of what makes the MTV event in Plymouth so unique is its lasting legacy and influence it has on its audience. It has always offered the chance to explore and discover new sounds and genres that may have otherwise been missed. It expanded the creative boundaries and embraced and propelled technological advances. And for 2019, MTV Music Week is aiming to do just that in a tangible way with the people of Plymouth and the South West as a whole.

Since MTV’s conception, it has set the standard for pop culture and year on year expanded on what defines pop culture. It has championed both established artists and those coming through the ranks. Hamzaa goes on to explain how it feels to be backed by such a huge brand like MTV, “This is big!!! It’s a big thing to me. Some of the greatest artists in the world have been championed and have come up through MTV. This is a real privilege for me.”  

Sharing those same emotions is Young T. & Bugsey, who will be performing at the Yo! MTV Raps event, at the legendary Plymouth venue, The Hub. They stated, “It’s so sick. We used to watch MTV growing up as kids, so to be certified by them now is great.”  Expressing what it means to be performing during MTV Music Week, they said, “We are so gassed to be a part of MTV Music Week! We are super, super happy (shout out MTV!). MTV have been supporting us for a while now, and so it’s really nice to be doing this event. “

MTV Music Week epitomizes what MTV is: it’s bringing the music industry to the people in the most accessible way possible. It’s daytime events run by MTV Breaks, focus on giving young people access to expert advice by industry insiders. Encouraging its attendees to dream big, whilst aiming to give them the knowledge, tools, and experiences to make those dreams become a reality.  Whilst its evening events focus on celebrating those who have come through the ranks of MTV and introducing them to the South West audience.

Charlotte Allkins | Marketing Assistant

Charlotte is the Marketing Assistant for Helm, coming from a design background she loves creating all types of content. Discover more of her blogs, as well as, many others here!

POPULAR POSTS

Basics of Email Marketing – Part 2

Last time we looked at how to get started with an email marketing campaign, including how to create an email marketing strategy and how to build up your email list. If you missed the first part of this series you can find it here. This time we’re taking a look at email marketing best practices and some regulations we recommend you follow.

Basics of Email Marketing – Part 1

Email marketing may seem a fairly old school method of marketing your next event in a world full of messaging and social media channels, but it’s still one of the most effective ways to get in front of your target audience and get results.

GET Monthly EMAIL UPDATES

GET Monthly EMAIL UPDATES