How to market your event on Twitter

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Social media moves fast, but nowhere is it faster than on Twitter. If you’re promoting events on Twitter, it means your marketing strategy needs to evolve quickly too.

Twitter may be one of the most challenging networks for social media event marketing, but it’s also one of the most rewarding. 

What makes Twitter a unique platform for events

Tweets may be short, but the Twitter community is large: the platform has 320 million monthly active users. Used by 21% of women and 24% of men, Twitter is most popular among high-income millennials: a prime ticket-buying demographic.

If your event draws a younger, tech-savvy crowd, Twitter should be a vital part of your promotion strategy. Michelle Manafy of Inc. calls Twitter users “information junkies,” referring to a wide variety of information: technology, news, sports, marketing, journalism etc.

Choosing an event hashtag and Twitter bio

The first step in promoting your event on Twitter is to create a hashtag and bio that embodies the spirit of your event.

Hashtags are one of the most effective ways to consolidate conversation about your event on Twitter. When choosing an event hashtag, you want to keep it concise and memorable. When in doubt, consider simply using your event name, its acronym, or even including a hashtag in the official name of your event. Also, be sure to double check that the hashtag isn’t already being used. Before finalising your event hashtag, search Twitter to make sure it’s not already in use.

Your event’s Twitter bio is one of the first things people will see on your profile. As Google prioritises social media profiles, it’s likely your Twitter account will show up high in search results for your event.

Write a brief, catchy profile — ideally just one sentence — that describes your event and gives the date, location and link to the ticketing page of the next event.

And don’t forget the value of images on social media. You’ll want to use your logo as the profile picture and a fun photo of a recent event for your banner photo that captures the excitement from a previous event. Your Twitter profile photo should be 400×400 pixels, and your header image should be 1500×1500 pixels.

Promoting your event on Twitter

Culturally relevant and timely posts work great on Twitter. Twitter users are usually most interested in news, quick tips, interesting articles, and trending topics. Use quick, witty, and eye-catching updates to engage them with your event.

Every social media platform is a bit different, but on Twitter images are king. Posts with images are a third more likely to get retweeted than posts without them, according to Twitter.

Beyond images, keep the post concise (obviously) and as eye-catching and to the point as possible. Send out news, tips, how-tos, interesting articles and trends. And ideally, you’ll want to keep them shorter than the 140 character limit. The ideal length depends on your audience, but in general stick to a 70 to 100 character range. Tweets shorter than 100 characters have a 17% higher engagement rate, according to social media management platform Buffer.

Be aware that a tweet reaches its peak after 18 minutes, so you’ll want to post more frequently than on other networks! 

The best time to tweet

Most tweets are sent between noon and 1pm in each time zone. This could be because there’s a lot of people engaging with Twitter at that time, but it could not. You’ll need to run some tests to work out what times of day your particular audience is on Twitter.

You don’t need fancy analytics to find the best time to use Twitter for events. For a week, try posting once a day during that noon prime time, and once during a less popular hour. Then look back on your tweet impressions for each post, which you can find in Twitter’s free analytics. See which time slot is getting your posts in front of the most eyes, and stick with that.

Using Twitter walls at the event

At the event, it’s worth showcasing a Twitter wall. These screens display tweets and images as they’re posted — if they’re tagged with your event’s hashtag. People love to be in the spotlight on these tweet walls, and your attendees are no exception.

To encourage use, make sure your hashtag is visible on displays and screens throughout the event so people don’t forget it.

Twitter is face-paced and whilst that may seem intimidating it offers a variety of opportunities to get in front of your potential audience and become essential in your social media marketing toolbelt. 

Keep up to date with marketing ideas and company updates here on our blog as well as on our LinkedIn!

Charlotte Allkins | Marketing Assistant

Charlotte is the Marketing Assistant for Helm, coming from a design background she loves creating all types of content. Discover more of her blogs, as well as, many others here!

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How to market your event on Twitter

Social media moves fast, but nowhere is it faster than on Twitter. If you’re promoting events on Twitter, it means your marketing strategy needs to evolve quickly too.

Twitter may be one of the most challenging networks for social media event marketing, but it’s also one of the most rewarding.

How to market your event on Facebook

Facebook isn’t just the world’s favourite social media platform, it’s also a powerful events hub. With 490 million people using Facebook events every month, it’s the discovery site many people turn to when they want to find out what’s going on in their area.

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How to market your event on Facebook

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Facebook isn’t just the world’s favourite social media platform, it’s also a powerful events hub. With 490 million people using Facebook events every month, it’s the discovery site many people turn to when they want to find out what’s going on in their area.

Naturally, Facebook is also a competitive space for event marketing. Last year alone saw 38 million events created by Facebook Pages. It’s easy to get overwhelmed by the sheer volume of other events competing in the space.

To stand out, you need to know a few fundamental things. Facebook’s display algorithms reward events that are listed and advertised in particular ways.

So here are a few of our tips to help you market your event more efficiently on Facebook.

Optimise it for mobile

You don’t just want people to find out about your event. You want them to buy tickets.

Since the majority of Facebook traffic takes place on mobile, you’ll want to make sure your checkout process is mobile-optimised. The user shouldn’t have to pinch and zoom to read text or make a purchase. The “buy” button should be easy to find and click on a small screen. The form fields must be mobile-friendly.

Taking these steps reduces friction for users and makes it easier to checkout. In fact, events see a 160% lift in conversion with mobile-optimised payment processes. With Helm Tickets the event page we create for you and the whole checkout process is already mobile optimised.

Charlotte Allkins | Marketing Assistant

Charlotte is the Marketing Assistant for Helm, coming from a design background she loves creating all types of content. Discover more of her blogs, as well as, many others here!

POPULAR POSTS

NEW: Payout frequencies and on demand payouts

We’ve updated the way you receive your payouts on Helm Tickets! You now have more control over when you receive your funds and can select the payout frequency that best suits you. These new features allow you to access your funds when you need them. It’s completely up...

How to market your event on Twitter

Social media moves fast, but nowhere is it faster than on Twitter. If you’re promoting events on Twitter, it means your marketing strategy needs to evolve quickly too.

Twitter may be one of the most challenging networks for social media event marketing, but it’s also one of the most rewarding.

How to market your event on Facebook

Facebook isn’t just the world’s favourite social media platform, it’s also a powerful events hub. With 490 million people using Facebook events every month, it’s the discovery site many people turn to when they want to find out what’s going on in their area.

GET Monthly EMAIL UPDATES

GET Monthly EMAIL UPDATES

How to market your event on LinkedIn

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With new social networks being created regularly, LinkedIn can be a platform that’s often forgotten about and underused. However, it can be an incredibly powerful tool for marketing your event – especially if you’re aware of many of the platform’s hidden tools that don’t seem to get the attention they deserve.

To help you learn how to use LinkedIn effectively to promote your next event,here are some tips to show why it shouldn’t be overlooked.

What is LinkedIn?

Before we jump into the tips here’s a quick overview of LinkedIn as a social media platform. It launched in 2003 and is the fourth most popular social media network among US adults.  It’s primarily centered around careers and business and enables users to connect and share content with other professionals, including colleagues, potential employers, business partners and new employees. If you run a B2B or career-focused event, LinkedIn can be a fantastic marketing tool.

1. Customise your public profile URL. Make your personal profile look more professional and easier to share by customising your LinkedIn public profile URL. Instead of a URL with a million confusing numbers it will look more clean and professional.

2. Add a LinkedIn background photo to your personal profile. In June 2014 LinkedIn jumped on the ‘cover photo bandwagon’ and started rolling out the ability for users to add a background photo to their personal profiles. This gives your LinkedIn profile a little more personality and can be a great way of promoting your event if you have a social media banner prepared.  Don’t forget, LinkedIn is a professional network so make sure you choose your photo accordingly!

3. Add a ProFinder badge to your profile. LinkedIn has made some changes to the types of badges that are available over the years. Depending on what you’re trying to accomplish, you may want to consider adding a ProFinder Badge, which is used to identify freelancers and services within LinkedIn’s ProFinder network. This is a service which matches contractors with project managers seeking help.

4. Take advantage of the blog/website links on your profile. Instead of using the default anchor text links in the website list within your LinkedIn profile’s contact info section, you can now add links to your portfolio and social networks. You can also add links to your work under each job description, so if you’re looking to increase clicks through to your event, make sure you populate those areas with the online presence you want to draw most attention to. There’s now also the option to upload multimedia for a given job or project. For example, if you have some photos or video content of your event you can add those in to help promote your event.

5. Search engine optimise your LinkedIn profile. SEO isn’t just limited to blogging. You can also optimise your profile to get discovered by people searching LinkedIn for key terms. You can add these words to various sections of your profile, such as your headline, your summary, and your work experience.

6. Add, remove and rearrange entire sections of your profile. LinkedIn also enables you to reorder entire sections of your profile in anyway you prefer. When in edit mode simply hover your mouse over the double sided arrow in each section. Your mouse will turn into a four arrowed icon, at which point you can click then drag and drop another position on your profile. This way you can prioritise event related media to the top of your profile.

7. Use open messages to send messages to people you aren’t connected to. With the exception of your fellow group members, LinkedIn only allows you to send messages to people who you share a first degree connection with. But some people let you send message to them anyway, even if you aren’t connected. The ability to be a part of the Open Profile network is only available to premium account holders, but it allows users to choose to be available for messaging by any other LinkedIn member, regardless of their membership level. This is perfect for reaching out to people who may be an asset to your event team or simply promoting your event to a larger network.
There are other options for sending messages to those you’re not yet connected with, like sending a request to connect with a note attached. We don’t recommend overusing this. If you’re a premium account member you can also use InMail.

8. Check your network updates or share your own. Found on your LinkedIn home page, network updates are essentially LinkedIn’s version of the Facebook newsfeed. Check this feed periodically for a quick snapshot of what your connections are up to and sharing, or share updates of your own, such as a noteworthy content related to your event. You can also sign up for email notifications and sort by top updates or recent updates to filter your feed one way or another.

9. Be identifiable. Allowing others to see who you are if you view their profile. To enable this, visit your settings (click your thumbnail image on the top right and click Privacy & Settings) and then click “Profile Viewing Options” under “Privacy”. Make sure you check off the ‘Your Name’ and ‘Headline’ (which is the recommended option), as it will allow you to take advantage of the next tip on our list!

10. Check out who’s viewed your LinkedIn profile. The ‘Who’s Viewed Your Profile’ tool, which is accessible in the main navigation via the profile dropdown, allows you to identify which other LinkedIn users have visited your profile page. In fact, LinkedIn gave this a facelift in February 2014, so the information it provides is better than ever. You can now also see how you stack up against your profile views for your connections, people in your company, and other professionals like you.

This is useful if someone has been checking out your profile who you’d like to connect with or who could be potentially interested in your event. This could be the ‘in’ you’ve been waiting for to connect. This feature is only available if you follow the above steps though.

11. Easily find new connections – or reconnect with old ones. The connections tab in the top navigation offers multiple tools to grow and connect with contacts in your professional network. When viewing your connections, click the “Manage your synced and imported contacts”  and from there you’ll be able to sync your email contact to see who’s on LinkedIn and who you can invite to join. These contacts can be essential when it comes to spreading the word about your event and offering support on the contact you may share regarding your event.

12. Make the most out of LinkedIn groups – Did you know that if you’re a member of the same group as another user you can bypass the need to be a first degree connection in order to message them? As long as you’ve been a member of LinkedIn for at least 30 days and a member of a particular group for at least 4 days, LinkedIn allows you to send up to 15 free 1:1 messages to fellow group members a month (across all groups you belong to).In addition to this group, members are also able to view the profiles of other members of the same group without being connected. Join more groups relevant to your event and industry to enable more direct messaging possibilities and make sure you participate in discussions to build trust within your group.

13. Share your LinkedIn status updates on Twitter. Ever since the LinkedIn/Twitter breakup of 2012, you can no longer automatically sync your tweets to publish on LinkedIn. However, as long as you add your Twitter account, the opposite is still possible. So if you’re posting an update about your event to LinkedIn that you’d also like your Twitter followers to see, you can easily syndicate that update to Twitter by selecting the Public + Twitter option in the dropdown menu within the LinkedIn update composer. This tool is perfect for making sure your event updates are consistent across both platforms.

14. Leverage @mentions in your status updates. In 2013, LinkedIn rolled out the ability to tag or @mention other users and companies in status updates – much like the way it works on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. So if you want another LinkedIn user or company to see your status update, you just need to include the @ symbol immediately before the user or company’s name in your status update. As a result, that user/company will get alerted that you mentioned them and their name will also link their profile/page in the status update itself. This is great if you have event partners you wish to mention and promote your own updates. It will also encourage them to reshare your update to their network.

15. Optimise your LinkedIn company/event page. The design of the LinkedIn Company page has changed a lot over the years. Make sure yours is set up correctly and optimised for the latest layout, featuring a compelling and high quality banner image. If you’re setting up your page for the first time, LinkedIn has a great walk through process to make sure you don’t miss anything out.

16. Created targeted LinkedIn showcase pages. LinkedIn Showcase Pages are niche pages that branch off from your main company page. Think of them as extensions of your main company page that allow you to promote specific events/products, or use to cater to a more individual marketing persona. This provides a more personalised experience for your company page visitors.

LinkedIn users can also follow more specific Showcase Pages without having to follow the company’s main page or its other Showcase Pages. This allows your business to tailor the page closely to the audience of the specific page. Which makes this feature perfect if you’re a business that runs events as a side project instead of an ‘events only’ business.

To create a Showcase Page, go to your Company Page and click “Manage page.”  At the top, click “Admin Tools,” and select “Create a Showcase Page.

17. Post company status updates and target them. Make the most of your LinkedIn company page by publishing company status updates for all your page followers to see. This will give LinkedIn users even more reason to follow your company page, growing your LinkedIn reach. Here’s some of LinkedIn’s advice for sharing company status updates.

If you’ve already mastered updating your company’s status, you can take it to the next level by using the power of segmentation with LinkedIn’s targeting options. These enable you to target your status updates to specific users. Company page admins can target their updates using criteria like company size, industry, job function, seniority, geography, language or even by including/excluding company employees. These targeted updates will appear on the company/showcase page itself for those users as well as in the user’s network updates feed on their LinkedIn home page. This is perfect if you’re running a medical conference, for example, and you only want to target people who work in the medical profession instead of your entire network who may not be interested. This ensures their own feeds aren’t getting clogged up by posts that aren’t relevant to what they want to see

18. Check out LinkedIn’s ‘Content Marketing Score’ & ‘Trending Content’ resources – If you’re a LinkedIn Business Solutions customer, you can learn how impactful your organic and paid LinkedIn content is with the Content Marketing Score and Trending Content resources. Your content marketing score measures user engagement with your sponsored updates, company pages, LinkedIn groups, employee updates and influencer posts when applicable. It then provides recommendations for how you can improve your score, and thus the effectiveness of your LinkedIn content.

19. Experiment with LinkedIn Ads and Sponsored Updates – If you’re looking to complement your organic LinkedIn marketing efforts with some paid advertising, LinkedIn Ads are a smart choice. One of the biggest benefits of LinkedIn advertising is the targeting options. LinkedIn’s PPC ads let you target specific job titles, job functions, industries, or company size, to name a few. You’ll be reaching people who are more likely to be interested in your content and your event. For more information on LinkedIn Ads click here.

20. Create your own industry LinkedIn Group, and join other relevant groups. Create a group based on a relevant industry related topic, and become a LinkedIn group admin. You may use this to establish yourself as a thought leader in your industry, grow a community of advocates, generate new marketing content idea and eventually generate new leads. You should also consider joining and getting executives from your business or event to join other relevant groups and positively participate in discussions to exhibit thought and leadership in your industry and event.

21. Email your LinkedIn group. One of the perks of managing a LinkedIn group is that you can email all the members of your group, up to once a week. These emails take the form of LinkedIn Announcements, which are messages sent directly to the email inboxes of group members (if they’ve enabled messages from groups in their settings). It’s the perfect opportunity for generating new leads for your event from LinkedIn, particularly if you’ve managed to build up a solid group of users.

22. Experiment with publishing content on LinkedIn’s publishing platform. Publishing is available to all users. Experiment with how this feature can support your event marketing goals by creating content for the platform and promoting it through your company page. For example, you could experiment with syndicating content from your events blog to LinkedIn Pulse and using it to promote a subscription to your full blog.

To publish an article, click “Write an article” on the update box on your LinkedIn homepage. From there, you’ll be taken to the publishing platform where you can compose your draft.

23. Add the ‘Company Follow’ and ‘LinkedIn Share’ buttons to your website and content.  Promote your company’s LinkedIn presence and help grow the reach of your company or event page by adding the ‘Company Follow’ button to your event’s website. Also consider adding the ‘LinkedIn Share’ button to your various content assets like blog posts, emails, and landing pages to extend the reach of your content to LinkedIn users.

24. Analyse your LinkedIn marketing performance with the Analytics tab on your Company Page. Use your Company Page Analytics to evaluate the performance of your Company Page. This feature offers data about the effectiveness of your page’s status updates, engagement, and reach, as well as information about your page’s followers — demographics, where they came from, how your following has grown over time, how your data compares to other companies.

Over the last few years, LinkedIn has had a huge overhaul that’s led it to be one of the most prevalent social media platforms in the world, carving out its niche by focusing on the business community. It’s added a variety of features that make it perfect for promoting events, through both personal profiles and company pages. We hope these tips are useful for helping you promote your next event on LinkedIn, whether you’re a first time user or a LinkedIn veteran.

Charlotte Allkins | Marketing Assistant

Charlotte is the Marketing Assistant for Helm, coming from a design background she loves creating all types of content. Discover more of her blogs, as well as, many others here!

POPULAR POSTS

NEW: Payout frequencies and on demand payouts

We’ve updated the way you receive your payouts on Helm Tickets! You now have more control over when you receive your funds and can select the payout frequency that best suits you. These new features allow you to access your funds when you need them. It’s completely up...

How to market your event on Twitter

Social media moves fast, but nowhere is it faster than on Twitter. If you’re promoting events on Twitter, it means your marketing strategy needs to evolve quickly too.

Twitter may be one of the most challenging networks for social media event marketing, but it’s also one of the most rewarding.

How to market your event on Facebook

Facebook isn’t just the world’s favourite social media platform, it’s also a powerful events hub. With 490 million people using Facebook events every month, it’s the discovery site many people turn to when they want to find out what’s going on in their area.

GET Monthly EMAIL UPDATES

GET Monthly EMAIL UPDATES

How to write a great blog for your events

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Writing blogs for your event is really important when it comes to engaging your audience and marketing your event.

Blogs are essential for a variety of reasons, including helping to boost your SEO ranking (search engine optimisation), giving you plenty of content to promote on social media, and giving additional insights into your event, helping future ticket buyers make a decision on buying tickets to your event. They’re also great for adding in calls to action to help generate ticket buying leads.

Writing blogs can seem a daunting task, especially when you feel you could be doing something more active to market your event. But keep reading for advice to help take your blog to the next level, or for a great starting point if you’ve never written a blog before.

What is a blog?

Blog is literally short for “web log”. Since the early 1990s blogs have been a form of online journal for people to publish their thoughts and narratives on their own sites. The idea is to share your views with other internet users. Blog posts used to be far more personal to the writer, whereas now they are primarily a marketing and promotional tool.

 

How to write a blog post

  1. Understand your audience – Before you start to write your first blog post it’s good to have a solid understanding of your target audience. You need to think about what they want to know about. What will resonate with them? By creating target personas you can easily begin to identify your audience’s interests and needs.

    For example, if your target audience for your event is millennials looking to start their own business, you probably don’t need to create a blog on how to use social media, as many of them have grown up with social media. However, you might want to inform them about how to tailor their tone on social media to their audience. That tweak is what will set your blog apart from generic blogs to something specifically created for your audience.
  2. Create your blog’s domain – You’ll need a place to host this and every other blog post you write. This requires choosing a content management system (CMS) and a website domain hosting service.

    Sign Up With a Content Management SystemA CMS helps you create a website domain where you’ll actually publish your blog. The CMS platforms available for you to sign up for can manage domains, where you create your own website; and subdomains, where you create a webpage that connects with an existing website.A popular option is a self-hosted WordPress website on WP Engine. Whether you create a domain or a subdomain to start your blog, you’ll need to choose a web domain hosting service after choosing their CMS.Register a Domain or Subdomain With a Website HostYour own blog domain will look like this: www.yourblog.com. The name between the two full stops is up to you, as long as this domain name doesn’t already exist on the internet.

    If you already own a cooking business at www.yourcompany.com, you might generate a blog that looks like this: blog.yourcompany.com. In other words, your blog’s subdomain will live in its own part of yourcompany.com.

    Some CMSs offer subdomains as a free service, where your blog lives on the CMS, rather than your business’s website. For example, it might look like “yourblog.contentmanagementsystem.com.” However, in order to create a subdomain that belongs to a company website, you’ll need to register this subdomain with a website host.

3. Customise your blog’s theme– Once you have your blog domain set up, you can customise the look of your blog to match the theme of your event and the content you plan on producing.

Are you writing about your events sustainability and the environment? Green might be a colour to keep in mind when designing the look and feel of your blog, as green is often associated with sustainability.

If you already manage a website for your event and are writing your first blog post for that website, it’s important that your blog is consistent with this existing event website, both in appearance and subject matter. Two things to include right away are:

  • Logo – This can be your events or your business’s logo, either one helping to remind your readers who or what is publishing this content. How heavily you want to brand this blog to your event is up to you.
  • “About” page – You might already have an “About” blurb describing your event or your business. Your blog’s “About” section is an extension of this higher-level statement. Think of it as your blog’s mission statement, which serves to support the goals of your event.

4. Identify your first blog post’s theme – Before you start writing you’ll need to pick a topic for your blog post. The topic can be pretty general to start with.

Then, as you do your research, you can expand on the topic to discuss various branches related to your core topic.

There are a few ways you can go about structuring your blog. It could be:

  • A list based post – e.g. ‘5 things to check out at your event’
  • Curated collection post – e.g. ‘10 event essentials’ 
  • News post – e.g. ‘A new study shows X% of people something related to your event’

If you’re still having trouble coming up with ideas for your event blogs we’d recommend taking a look at topics you may have already covered and putting a new twist on it. This can be done by: 

  • Changing the topic
  • Adjusting the time frame 
  • Choosing a new audience
  • Taking a positive/negative approach
  • Introducing a new format

5. Decide on a working title – Coming up with a title, or even multiple versions of a title, can help you with different ways of approaching a subject which might help you eventually focus your subject. Creating a working title that’s specific can act as a guidepost for when you start writing.

A working title doesn’t have to be the final title. Its purpose is to provide you with enough information to focus your writing on something more specific compared to a generic overwhelming subject.

6. Write your intro – The intro is where you’re going to need to capture your readers’ attention. The first few paragraphs and sometimes even sentences are where you’re most likely to lose your reader before they’ve even given your blog a fair chance. There are a number of ways you can go about this: tell a joke, be empathetic, or even grip the reader with an interesting fact or statistic.

After, describe the purpose of the post and explain how it can address a problem the reader may be having. This will give the reader a reason to keep reading and give them a connection to how it could help them improve their knowledge or a situation they may be in.

7. Organise your content in an outline – Sometimes blogs can have what feels like an overwhelming level of information, for both the reader and the writer. The trick is to organise this information so readers are not intimidated by the length or amount of content. This organisation can take several forms: sections, lists, tips or whatever you feel is most appropriate for your content. Keeping everything organised is essential!

This blog itself is an example of how to keep your content organised. We’ve broken it up into sections and if needed subsections if we need to go into more detail about a specific subject, making the content easier to read as a whole.

The best way to go about this is to outline your post before you start writing. That way you’ll know exactly which points you need to cover and work out the best order to do it in. 

8. Write your blog post – The next step is to get writing! Now that you have your outline and your template for how you want to structure your blog, all you need to do is fill in the gaps. Use your outline as a guide and be sure to expand on all your points as needed. Write about what you already know and if you need to do additional research to gather further information, examples and data to back up your ideas. Make sure you provide proper attribution when including external sources.

If you’re having trouble bringing all of your points and ideas together, you’re not alone. Finding your writing flow can be challenging for many people. Luckily there are lots of resources online to help you find your flow and help your writing depending on what you’re looking for.

9. Proofreading and formatting – The editing part of content creation is an important part of blogging which shouldn’t be overlooked. There are plenty of tools online to help you grammar check your writing, but you can always ask a grammar-conscious coworker to look over your piece if you want to have everything double checked.

  • Featured image – Making your blog post visually appealing is an important part of creating blog posts. Social networks treat content with images more prominently, visuals are now more responsible than ever for the success of your blog content in social media. It’s been shown that content with relevant images sees 94% more views than content without relevant images. Just make sure you pay close attention to copyright law if you are using someone else’s image for your blog.
  • Visual appearance – Ugly blog posts make reading the content significantly harder. Making sure your blog post is visually appealing by making sure your formatting and organisation are clear is crucial.

    In a properly formatted and visually appealing blog post, you’ll notice that header and sub-headers are used to break up large blocks of text — and those headers are styled consistently.
  • Topics and tags – Tags are specific, public-facing keywords that describe a post. They also allow readers to browse for more content in the same category on your blog. Refrain from adding a laundry list of tags to each post. Instead, put some thought into a tagging strategy. Think of tags as “topics” or “categories,” and choose 10-20 tags that represent all the main topics you want to cover on your blog. Then stick to those.

10. Insert your CTA (call to action) at the end – At the end of every blog post, you should have a CTA that indicates what you want the reader to do next (e.g. buy tickets to your event).

Typically, you think about the CTA being beneficial for you, the one marketing your event. Your visitors read your blog post,  click on the CTA, and eventually, you generate a lead. But the CTA is also a valuable resource for the person reading your content. You can use your CTAs to offer more content similar to the subject of the post they just finished reading.

11. Optimised your blog for SEO (search engine optimisation) – Don’t worry about how many keywords to include. If there are opportunities to incorporate keywords you’re targeting, and it won’t impact reader experience, do it. If you can make your URL shorter and more keyword-friendly, go for it. But don’t cram in keywords or shoot for some arbitrary keyword density because Google knows!

  • Meta Description: Meta descriptions are the descriptions below the post’s page title on Google’s search results pages. They present searchers with a short summary of the post before clicking into it. They are generally between 150-160 characters and start with a verb, such as “Learn,” “Read,” or “Discover.” While meta descriptions no longer factor into Google’s keyword ranking algorithm, they do give searchers a picture of what they’ll get by reading the post and can help improve your click-through rate from search.
  • Page Title and Headers: Most blogging software uses your post title as your page title, which is the most critical on-page SEO element at your disposal. But if you’ve followed us so far, you should already have a working title that will naturally incorporate the keywords/phrases your target audience is engaged with. Don’t overcomplicate your title by trying to fit keywords in where they don’t naturally belong. That said, if there are clear chances to add keywords you’re targeting to your post title and headers, feel free to take them. 
  • Anchor text: Anchor text is the word or words that link to another page, either on your website or on another website. Carefully select which keywords you want to link to other pages on your site because search engines take that into consideration when ranking your page for specific keywords. It’s also necessary to consider which pages you link to. Consider linking to pages that you want to rank well for that keyword. You could end up getting it to rank on Google’s first page of results instead of its second page.
  • Mobile optimisation: With mobile devices now accounting for nearly 2 out of every 3 minutes spent online, having a website that’s responsive or produced for mobile has become increasingly significant. In addition to making sure your website’s visitors (including your events blog visitors) have the best experience possible, optimising for mobile will score your website some SEO points.

12. Finalise your title – Last but not least is finalising the title you want to run with. Some things to consider when choosing your final title are:

  • Start with your working title.
  • As you start to edit your title, keep in mind that it’s important to keep the title accurate and clear.
  • Then work on making your title more powerful, whether it’s through strong language, alliteration, or another literary tactic.
  • If you can, optimise for SEO by sneaking some keywords in there (only if it’s natural, though).
  • Finally, see if you can shorten it at all. No-one likes a long, overwhelming title, and remember, Google prefers 65 characters or fewer before it truncates it on its search engine results pages.
This is our complete guide on how to write great blog content for your next event. Blogs are essential for building a connection with your audience and work as a fantastic promotional tool for your next event. For more details on marketing techniques for your event keep up to date with our blog and follow us on LinkedIn.
Charlotte Allkins | Marketing Assistant

Charlotte is the Marketing Assistant for Helm, coming from a design background she loves creating all types of content. Discover more of her blogs, as well as, many others here!

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Basics of Email Marketing – Part 4

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Charlotte Allkins | Marketing Assistant

Charlotte is the Marketing Assistant for Helm, coming from a design background she loves creating all types of content. Discover more of her blogs, as well as, many others here!

POPULAR POSTS

NEW: Payout frequencies and on demand payouts

We’ve updated the way you receive your payouts on Helm Tickets! You now have more control over when you receive your funds and can select the payout frequency that best suits you. These new features allow you to access your funds when you need them. It’s completely up...

How to market your event on Twitter

Social media moves fast, but nowhere is it faster than on Twitter. If you’re promoting events on Twitter, it means your marketing strategy needs to evolve quickly too.

Twitter may be one of the most challenging networks for social media event marketing, but it’s also one of the most rewarding.

How to market your event on Facebook

Facebook isn’t just the world’s favourite social media platform, it’s also a powerful events hub. With 490 million people using Facebook events every month, it’s the discovery site many people turn to when they want to find out what’s going on in their area.

GET Monthly EMAIL UPDATES

GET Monthly EMAIL UPDATES

Helm Tickets Is Now Offering Print Services

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We’re delighted to announce that we’re launching our print services exclusively to you, our organizers! The print services available will include business cards, flyers, posters, and banners, with the option of more bespoke packages available upon request!

To celebrate the launch of our print services we’re offering 20% off our price list here until the 12th July as an introductory offer! Contact our sales team now for more details! 

Printed media is still an indispensable factor in any event promotion strategy. It’s one of the best ways of reaching the general public and those who may not have otherwise heard about your event. Here are a few examples of how and why you should invest in printed media for your event!

Business Cards

In the age of social media, you would think that business cards no longer have their place. Yet when it comes to promoting your next event or networking whilst at your own event they can be invaluable. 

They are incredibly important for any form of person-to-person networking. Business card aesthetics are incredibly valuable for company representation and 72% of people still judge businesses from their cards

Flyers

Event flyers are one of the most traditional, creative and interesting ways to attract people to your event. While they’re talked about less thanks to the dominance of digital channels, they still play a vital part in many organizer’s event promotion strategies.

There are several ways you can go about distributing your event flyers to maximize your exposure: 

  • Local shops and services
  • Direct Mail
  • Door drops
  • Street distribution

Posters

There are a variety of ways to communicate with your target market, but one of the most beneficial is by using large scale posters that can clearly display your message. When used correctly, posters can catch the eyes of people and make them aware of an event they wouldn’t otherwise have known about. This powerful ability to stick in people’s minds can have huge advantages for events looking to create brand awareness. 

Banners

Banners are a great promotional tool as they are instantly noticeable because of their size or their color, which draws the eye. In busy areas, banners can be used to separate your event from the rest of the crowd. People have been trained to associate large banners with an exciting event. They have been used throughout history at fairs, markets and many other locations. People know that when they see a banner, something is going on that deserves their attention. Which why they are perfect for advertising your event!

Stickers

Stickers are an inexpensive and easy way to get your event and brand out there. They are perfect for guerrilla marketing your event (Guerrilla marketing is an advertisement strategy in which a company uses unconventional communications in order to promote a product or service.) You can use them anywhere you think will get peoples attention or hand them out for others to share for you. 

For all of these items we can customize them to any size and specification you may need, with more options on paper finishes and sizes upon request. From there we can create a bespoke package to meet the needs of your event!

Key information: 

  • All artwork is to be supplied by you. If you do require artwork to be created we can look into this upon inquiry.
  • We can provide you with templates but it will be your responsibility to ensure the quality and sizes are all correct.
  • There will be free postage to all UK organizers!
  • For organizers outside of the UK, postage price will depend on the size and weight of the item.
Until the 12th of July, you can get 20% off our print services so get in contact with our sales team to see what we can do for you!

Print the promotion material for your event with Helm Tickets!

Charlotte Allkins | Marketing Assistant

Charlotte is the Marketing Assistant for Helm, coming from a design background she loves creating all types of content. Discover more of her blogs, as well as, many others here!

POPULAR POSTS

NEW: Payout frequencies and on demand payouts

We’ve updated the way you receive your payouts on Helm Tickets! You now have more control over when you receive your funds and can select the payout frequency that best suits you. These new features allow you to access your funds when you need them. It’s completely up...

How to market your event on Twitter

Social media moves fast, but nowhere is it faster than on Twitter. If you’re promoting events on Twitter, it means your marketing strategy needs to evolve quickly too.

Twitter may be one of the most challenging networks for social media event marketing, but it’s also one of the most rewarding.

How to market your event on Facebook

Facebook isn’t just the world’s favourite social media platform, it’s also a powerful events hub. With 490 million people using Facebook events every month, it’s the discovery site many people turn to when they want to find out what’s going on in their area.

GET Monthly EMAIL UPDATES

GET Monthly EMAIL UPDATES